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Social Sciences Undergraduate Minors

Minor in Global Studies

Students can complement their majors with stronger insights into an increasingly interconnected world; how and why so many human activities and interests—including commerce, communication, research and development, cultural interactions, health, security and politics—have become dispersed around the world, and the challenges and opportunities these trends create for them.

Requirements:

15 credit hours (5 courses)

  • COM 306 or COM 436 or HIS 305 or HIS 306 or HIS 307 or HIS 311
  • Plus 9 additional hours in social sciences course.

Minor in Public Policy

Students who minor in Public Policy gain an understanding of how governmental actors make decisions and non-governmental actors shape those decisions.  They are introduced to the research methods used by social scientists to evaluate the success or failure of policy decisions, and apply them to the policy processes used in various locations around the globe.

Requirements:

15 credit hours (5 courses)

  • PS 306, PS 408,  and SSCI 209
  • Plus 6 additional hours in PS 312, or PS 313, or PS 338, or SSCI 354

Minor in Political Science

At Illinois Tech, political science is more than a theoretical discussion, it is an applied discipline that will give you the practical skills to identify and analyze real-world problems through the use of quantitative and qualitative research methods and policy analysis. At the same time, you will gain an understanding of the major concepts and the workings of political institutions, and learn about international relations, comparative politics, urban politics and public policy.

Requirements:

15 credit hours (5 courses)

  • PS 200 or PS 214 or PS 230 or PS 232
  • Plus 9 additional hours in political science.

Minor in Sociology

The study of sociology gives you powerful and innovative ways to think about and analyze human systems and behaviors. At Illinois Tech, you will study how technology, science, the built environment, social networks, and organizational structures shape the human experience. You will learn that things we commonly take for granted—morality, gender roles, the workings of the market, and even the notion of individuality—are produced through human interaction and are not merely natural. You will be challenged to understand how contemporary sociology is incubating fresh approaches to problems both local and global, theoretical and applied.

Requirements:

15 credit hours (5 courses)

  • SOC 200 or SOC 203
  • Plus 12 additional hours in sociology.

For further questions please contact Associate Chair Rebecca Steffenson.