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Marshall Brown and Peter Onuf Speak at Benjamin Franklin Project Distinguished Lecture

  • Peter Onuf and Marshall Brown
    Peter Onuf and Marshall Brown [photo credit: David Schalliol]
  • Peter Onuf
    Peter Onuf [photo credit: David Schalliol]
  • Marshall Brown
    Marshall Brown [photo credit: David Schalliol]
  • Marshall Brown
    Marshall Brown [photo credit: David Schalliol]
  • Lewis Department of Humanities Chair Maureen Flanagan, Peter Onuf, and Marshall Brown
    Lewis Department of Humanities Chair Maureen Flanagan, Peter Onuf, and Marshall Brown [photo credit: David Schalliol]
  • Spring 2013 Benjamin Franklin Project
    Spring 2013 Benjamin Franklin Project [photo credit: David Schalliol]
  • Spring 2013 Benjamin Franklin Project
    Spring 2013 Benjamin Franklin Project [photo credit: David Schalliol]
  • Marshall Brown
    Marshall Brown [photo credit: David Schalliol]
  • Spring 2013 Benjamin Franklin Project
    Spring 2013 Benjamin Franklin Project [photo credit: David Schalliol]

On February 26, Marshall Brown, IIT assistant professor of architecture, and University of Virginia historian Peter Onuf appeared together onstage at MTCC's McCloska Auditorium for the discussion "Democracy and the Built Environment," sponsored by the Benjamin Franklin Project through the Department of Social Sciences.

The two scholars approached the topic from different angles, with Onuf speaking on private space, specifically, the design of Thomas Jefferson's quarters at Monticello, and Brown addressing public space, in particular, the need to reconsider the "Jeffersonian grid" on the urban landscape. Onuf and Brown also sat down for a conversation with the audience, moderated by historian Maureen Flanagan, chair of IIT's Department of Humanities. The questions from the audience yielded several points of contact between the two speakers on issues related to cultivating the character of a democratic society.

The event also featured the photographic exhibit "Transitions," by sociologist David Schalliol, a collection that surveys change, social equality, and the urban landscape.

Jack Miller Center